New imaging technique can help pick out the most efficient carbon quantum dots

A new study by researchers from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and the University of Delaware, Baltimore County, in a collaborative project through the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at Illinois, used ultrafast nanometric imaging and found good and bad emitters among populations of carbon dots. This observation suggests that by selecting only super-emitters, carbon nanodots can be purified to replace toxic metal quantum dots in many applications, according to the researchers.

Cheap, nontoxic carbon nanodots poised to be quantum dots of the future image

“Coming into this study, we did not know if all carbon dots are only mediocre emitters or if some were perfect and others were bad,” said Illinois chemistry professor Martin Gruebele, who led the study. “We knew that if we could show that there are good ones and bad ones, maybe we could eventually find a way to pick the perfect ones out of the mix.”

Zhijing Nanotech and TCL introduce pQDs to LCD technology in a pilot projet

Perovskite QD film developer Zhijing Nanotech updated that it recently concluded a successful pilot with TCL to produce 500 75-inch QD-enhanced LCD TVs with Zhijing's PQDF films.

TCL 75M10 TV with Zhijing Nanotech's perovskite film photo
The company reports that the TVs featured a wide color gamut, 147% BT709 - which is higher than most QD TV's on the market, and higher than TCL's original 75M10 TVs. The green Cadmium-free pQD films have excellent optical properties and offer lower cost compared to current QD solutions, according to Zhijing Nanotech.